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One of Those Days Checklist for Parents

Yesterday, my well-behaved-two-year-old-at-the-library luck ran out. It could have been worse. We kept the chaos contained to the children’s section, and it was all of the noisy variety. Lately when we’ve gone to the library, Thadd has been content to read books and play with puzzles, so him not wanting to do much of anything but complain loudly was a little unexpected. I’m hoping it’s not an indication of what next week’s afternoon library activities will be like.

This photo was not taken yesterday.

It got me thinking about the days where you feel exhausted but like you haven’t actually done anything. Making a to-do list and checking things off, even if I only get a few things checked off makes me feel a little better. If you’re having one of those days and need something to show that you actually did something, here’s my “One of Those Days” checklist.

One of Those Days Checklist for Parents

  • Get out of bed
  • Get dressed (leggings, yoga pants, sweats, etc. count)
  • Eat something
  • Feed the little people
  • Feed the pets
  • Drink something
  • Hug the little people
  • Keep the little people alive
  • Referee an argument between little people
  • Answer the same question more than three times
  • Clean up a spill
  • Tell little people to sit down
  • Read a story to the little people
  • Put little people to bed

Feel free to print this out and use anytime you’re having a bad day and need to see that you’ve actually accomplished something. 🙂

 

 


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Summer recap

Photos from our summer adventures.

My baby got a haircut and instantly looked older.

We set up an “indoor” pool.

We visited the park.

And the library.

And an indoor playground.

We had lazy days.

And silly days.

We grew sunflowers.

We gained fur-babies.

We visited more parks, where I tried not to have heart attacks while my boys were monkeys.

And had fun.

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Easter

Everyone else is sharing their beautifully dressed littles with gorgeous Easter baskets. Our Easter festivities went in a bit of a different direction….

Finn is almost twelve and not interested in Easter baskets and egg hunts. Thadd and Beckett are, but neither are big fans of boiled eggs and I’d rather not have tons of candy around.

The solution I’ve found that keeps everyone happy is hiding cascarones. It’s not quite traditional, but smashing confetti eggs on your brother is something even preteens can enjoy.

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December

I can’t believe it’s already December. I love this time of year, but, honestly I could do without all the holidays making what little we have of fall and winter fly by. Meanwhile stinking, hot summer lasts from mid-April to Halloween with no big holidays to break it up. 

Anyway, unlike most years where I’m busy with random chaos and crafting until I realize Christmas is a week away and I still haven’t decorated, I got out our little Charlie Brown tree yesterday and let the boys decorate it. I stayed in the next room folding laundry so I wouldn’t be tempted to micromanage. 

Because that pretty much sums it up. They did a good job, though, and since they did it, I’m less likely to keep rearranging ornaments to get everything just right.

The lighting in that room is terrible. You can make out the toddler-height holes starting to develop while the top of the tree is looking a little crowded. I predict that by Christmas, the bottom of the tree up to about 3.5 feet off the ground will be bare except for lights.

If you look closely, you’ll see some painted pinecone decorations. When Finn was little, I got a huge batch of pinecones and spray painted them red, white and silver. Then I tied jute twine loops on them for hooks. That way, I didn’t have to worry about broken glass if he took them off the tree. He really didn’t bother with them much, though. As you can see, I’ve since gotten braver with ornaments, as have my children.

Have a wonderful weekend, and if you’d like to stay up to date on sales and new items in my Etsy shop, please sign up for my newsletter using the box to the right or at the bottom if you’re mobile. Thanks!

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Grocery Shopping with Children

If you have ever gone grocery shopping with young children, then you know what a treat it is to go shopping alone. On a recent shopping day, the whole family went to Aldi. Even with Chris there as backup, that trip resulted in my giving Instacart* a try. (Actual conversation with Instacart delivery guy: Him: Have a good day! Me: It’s a great day! I didn’t have to take my three kids shopping!!!!)

Beckett shopping
One of my little hooligans.

Aldi is awesome, but there’s always a few things I can’t get there, so on the way home we stopped at Kroger. Chris stayed in the car with the hooligans while I ran in to get the last few things we needed.

In the store, I occasionally ended up on the same aisle as a father with his three lovely daughters. I’m guessing they were all around elementary school age. What caught my attention about this family, was the fact that the father was experiencing his own version of the Aldi trip I had just survived. I never know if a smile or kind word in such situations will be seen as sincere or smug in such situations, so I politely ignored the chaos to finish my shopping.

At the checkout line, who should end up behind me, but the father and the three young ladies. If he was put there to remind me that all parents have those kinds of days, then I appreciate the reminder, but torturing another human being really was not necessary.

I continued with my plan of polite indifference to the humorous to everyone but the father scene that was taking place behind me. I’m pretty sure I failed to not smile when I heard such phrases as, “What have you done to the tortillias? Don’t put your mouth on that!”and the exasperated, “What is wrong with you?!?!???”

Hopefully it has been long enough that, should the father see and recognize this, he will be able to find the humor that is totally lacking when you are in the moment. Regardless, you have my empathy for that and every other similar shopping trip, as that is usually me. Also, Instacart* delivers to your door, if you need some time to recover.

He had a shirt on when we went in, I promise.

*Neither Instacart or Aldi offered any compensation for this post. After that particular Aldi trip, though, Aldi should consider offering me free Instacart delivery so I no longer have to bring my children into their store.