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Frumpy Knit Tube Dress to Cute T-Shirt Refashion

I’ve had two striped knit dresses in my refashion pile for about six months now. One black and white and one navy blue and white. The knit is soft, and I like the tie dye stripe, but the shape is basically a tube with a ruffle on the bottom. They are so unflattering, I don’t even want to wear them around the house. There’s a good amount of fabric in them, though, so I decided to try turn one of the knit tube dresses into a t-shirt.

Knit Tube Dress
Here’s the original shapeless dress. Excuse the background, please.

Knit tube dress to T-Shirt Refashion T shirt Process

I wasn’t sure what I would do at first, but I knew whatever it was wouldn’t need the straps, so I cut them off. I briefly considered leaving it close to as-is at that point and turning it into a skirt. It still wouldn’t have been very flattering, and I really don’t need any more casual skirts, so I moved on to other ideas.

T-shirts are always something I need, so that was my next direction. I didn’t take any process photos, so I’ll do my best to describe it. Refashioning always requires a little improvising based on what you have to work with, so consider this more as a guide than a complete how-to.

Turn the dress into fabric

I find it’s easiest to see what I have to work with when I’m looking at deconstructed pieces of fabric. Unless I think I’m going to use an element intact, I cut or rip out all seams and remove elements like buttons so that I can see how much fabric I have to use.

For this project, I cut off the black cotton eyelet band at the top and cut off the ruffle from the bottom before cutting off the side seams. I left the ruffle intact by cutting just above the seam that connected it to the dress because I thought it might come in handy. I chose to cut, rather than rip the seams, because the seams were narrow, so I wasn’t losing much fabric.

The Base Pattern

I thought about using a t-shirt as a pattern, but that doesn’t always work out as well. In my pattern files, I have a copy of the breezy tee from it’s always autumn, so I used that. I didn’t have enough fabric to make it exactly like the pattern, but it was a good starting point.

Laying it out

I squared up the main pieces of fabric and cut out the pattern. The fabric was too short for the pattern’s length, so I just focused on fitting in the top portion. I had to shorten the sleeves slightly because there wasn’t enough width.

Constructing the T-shirt

I serged (overlocked) the neckline folded it over and hemmed. I will probably regret not doing a banded neckline, because I’ve had hemmed necklines get wonky with wear. I can change it later if needed, though.

I serged the shoulder seams and then started thinking about the sleeves. The original pattern has pieces to create wide bands on the sleeves. I didn’t have enough scraps from the sides to create those bands. Instead, I decided to use the eyelet from the top of the dress. Honestly, I really wanted to use some of the ruffle to make flutter sleeves, but I figured that would be needed to add length.

Knit tube dress to T Shirt Refashion T shirt Eyelet Sleeve Band Closeup.
I’m still not sure about this. I may remove it after wearing it a few times.

After attaching the eyelet, I serged the underarm and side seams, then straight stitched just inside the serged seam to reinforce.

The shirt was more of a crop top at that point, so I attached the ruffle to the bottom by serging and then straight stitching like I did on the side seams. Here’s the final result.

Knit tube dress to T Shirt Refashion T shirt Finished Product.
Finished, other than steaming the ruffle.

I like it, other than the eyelet on the sleeves. I’m not sure about that. It’s not tight, but it makes the sleeves snug. I’ll probably wear it a few times and decide if I just want to take it off altogether. Overall, though, it’s a cute t-shirt and definitely something more wearable than the original.

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