Posted on Leave a comment

Friday Five

Sometimes throughout the week I think of things that I’d like to share with you but aren’t really worthy of a whole post. They could be things I’ve been working on, other sites I’ve discovered, shop or sale info, or general randomness. My solution is the Friday Five, where I quickly share some of those random or interesting things.

Sewing machine struggles

My Kenmore needs repair again. This time I got so frustrated with it that I packed it up and moved it off my desk. I don’t like using my Brother for anything except embroidery. I’d hate to mess up my only embroidery machine when I have another basic sewing machine. So, that leaves me with my vintage Montgomery Wards Signature. It works really well, but I’m not as familiar with all of the settings. I’m nervous about sewing anything special, because I don’t want to ruin anything by having tensions or stitch length wrong.

It’s also on the other side of my craft room from my other machines and in it’s own table. That means I have to bring everything I need over to it, rather than have it stored within reach. That all has deterred me from sewing lately.

I finally decided earlier this week to try to finish some of the masks I was working on when my Kenmore broke. Those are fairly simple and I have plenty of cotton fabric, so if my machine eats it, it’s not too bad. So far I only finished one, though, due to interruptions and being slow on an unfamiliar machine.

I guess someone felt the need to decorate it for Halloween.

Masks?

On the subject of masks, I’m contemplating adding them to my shop, but not sure if there’s still enough demand for handmade. I keep getting requests from friends and neighbors, though, so maybe? It would be nice to have them listed so I can have a catalog of sorts to show people when asked. Thoughts?

These were a special order from a friend. Luckily I finished them before my Kenmore broke. Sewing someone else’s fabric on an unfamiliar machine is scary.

Meal planning is hard

I had a dentist appointment last weekend that involved an extraction along with some fillings. That means that along with my usual gluten and dairy free restrictions, I’ve had to accommodate not really being able to chew. For most meals, that means planning for the family and separately for myself. I’ve also been fairly successful with losing some weight lately, so I didn’t want to get out of my healthy eating habits by living off mashed potatoes and ice cream for a week. That made it more challenging, because most of the healthy, filling foods I can think of require chewing. Luckily I’m down to only avoiding things that are crunchy or have small seeds that could get painfully stuck.

Odd shopping habits

I finally reorganized the pantry shelves this morning in an attempt to make meal planning easier. For some reason, I have four jars of salsa. Four! Three of them are the bigger jars, too, and all the same variety. I also have a ton of dried black beans, two varieties of split peas and lots of lentils. The black beans and lentils kind of make sense, but I’m the only one who likes split peas. I also thought I had black eyed peas and was planning on using them in a curry this weekend, but I don’t. At least now I know what I have and what I need.

Creative Home Projects Bundle 2020

The Creative Home Projects Bundle 2020 is only available for a few more hours. I talk more about it in this post. If you’re interested, be sure to order it before 11:59pm Eastern time tonight. For total disclosure, I do receive a small commission on bundles sold through my links. If you’re into DIY, I do think it’s worth having a look at the list of everything included and see if it’s right for you.

There’s also a 30 day money back guarantee. Before I became an affiliate, I purchased several of the bundles. I loved all except for one. Maybe it was because I already followed a lot of the authors in that bundle, but I just didn’t feel like I gained any new information from that particular bundle. I requested a refund by email within the 30 days and had it right away with no problems. I always hate guarantees or free trials that make it hard to cancel or request a refund, so I really appreciate how easy it was with Ultimate Bundles.

That’s it for today. Have a great weekend!

Posted on

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping

I wrap my soaps in fabric because it looks nice, it allows the soap to breathe (read here for why), and because it feels better than plastic. I often wonder what happens to the wrapping. I’m sure there are some that toss it. I know of one person who collects the fabric for quilts. For those of you who, like me, don’t want to throw away something that could be useful but don’t know what to do with it, I have a tutorial for a drawstring pouch, just for you.

This is done with the wrapping from one of my soaps, but you could make it in any size you like.

Materials
Cloth wrapper from soap (roughly 8×11 inches)
Jute string from soap (about 29 inches)
Thread

Tools
Needle or Sewing machine
Safety pin or Bodkin
Scissors
Iron

First, iron your fabric flat. Then, fold down a long edge about 3/4 of an inch to one inch and press. This is for the casing. It doesn’t have to be super precise.

Sew a straight seam along the bottom of the flap to form the casing. All the sewing can be done by hand or machine. I have no time or patience, so I choose machine. Fold your material in half with right sides together like a book.

The fold is at the bottom of this photo.

Next, starting just below the casing seam, sew down the side and across the bottom. I use anywhere from a 1/4 to 1/2 inch seam allowance for this. Again, it doesn’t have to be precise.

 With scissors, clip the bottom corners, being careful not to cut your stitching. You could probably skip this step, but it helps the corners look square and crisp. Turn your bag right side out.

Now it’s time to thread the string. Tie one end of the string to a safety pin, large paper clip, or attach a small bodkin. This makes it easier to work it through the casing. Thread it through the casing, safety pin first. 

Once you get the string to the other side, remove your safety pin or other tool and adjust the string so that the ends are even.

 Knot the ends together once or twice to keep it from coming out.

Ta-da! It’s done! Perfect for organizing your purse, storing jewelry or other small items, or as a small gift bag.

Or holding your favorite bar of soap.

Tutorials are always a little complicated to write because it’s easy to overlook small steps in things you do frequently. If something is unclear, please ask. 🙂

If you have any other creative uses for a SubEarthan Cottage soap wrapper, I would love to hear it!

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Posted on

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping

I wrap my soaps in fabric because it looks nice, it allows the soap to breathe (read here for why), and because it feels better than plastic. I often wonder what happens to the wrapping. I’m sure there are some that toss it. I know of one person who collects the fabric for quilts. For those of you who, like me, don’t want to throw away something that could be useful but don’t know what to do with it, I have a tutorial for a drawstring pouch, just for you.

This is done with the wrapping from one of my soaps, but you could make it in any size you like.

Materials
Cloth wrapper from soap (roughly 8×11 inches)
Jute string from soap (about 29 inches)
Thread

Tools
Needle or Sewing machine
Safety pin or Bodkin
Scissors
Iron

First, iron your fabric flat. Then, fold down a long edge about 3/4 of an inch to one inch and press. This is for the casing. It doesn’t have to be super precise.

Sew a straight seam along the bottom of the flap to form the casing. All the sewing can be done by hand or machine. I have no time or patience, so I choose machine. Fold your material in half with right sides together like a book.

The fold is at the bottom of this photo.

Next, starting just below the casing seam, sew down the side and across the bottom. I use anywhere from a 1/4 to 1/2 inch seam allowance for this. Again, it doesn’t have to be precise.

 With scissors, clip the bottom corners, being careful not to cut your stitching. You could probably skip this step, but it helps the corners look square and crisp. Turn your bag right side out.

Now it’s time to thread the string. Tie one end of the string to a safety pin, large paper clip, or attach a small bodkin. This makes it easier to work it through the casing. Thread it through the casing, safety pin first. 

Once you get the string to the other side, remove your safety pin or other tool and adjust the string so that the ends are even.

 Knot the ends together once or twice to keep it from coming out.

Ta-da! It’s done! Perfect for organizing your purse, storing jewelry or other small items, or as a small gift bag.

Or holding your favorite bar of soap.

Tutorials are always a little complicated to write because it’s easy to overlook small steps in things you do frequently. If something is unclear, please ask. 🙂

If you have any other creative uses for a SubEarthan Cottage soap wrapper, I would love to hear it!

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Posted on

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping

I wrap my soaps in fabric because it looks nice, it allows the soap to breathe (read here for why), and because it feels better than plastic. I often wonder what happens to the wrapping. I’m sure there are some that toss it. I know of one person who collects the fabric for quilts. For those of you who, like me, don’t want to throw away something that could be useful but don’t know what to do with it, I have a tutorial for a drawstring pouch, just for you.

This is done with the wrapping from one of my soaps, but you could make it in any size you like.

Materials
Cloth wrapper from soap (roughly 8×11 inches)
Jute string from soap (about 29 inches)
Thread

Tools
Needle or Sewing machine
Safety pin or Bodkin
Scissors
Iron

First, iron your fabric flat. Then, fold down a long edge about 3/4 of an inch to one inch and press. This is for the casing. It doesn’t have to be super precise.

Sew a straight seam along the bottom of the flap to form the casing. All the sewing can be done by hand or machine. I have no time or patience, so I choose machine. Fold your material in half with right sides together like a book.

The fold is at the bottom of this photo.

Next, starting just below the casing seam, sew down the side and across the bottom. I use anywhere from a 1/4 to 1/2 inch seam allowance for this. Again, it doesn’t have to be precise.

 With scissors, clip the bottom corners, being careful not to cut your stitching. You could probably skip this step, but it helps the corners look square and crisp. Turn your bag right side out.

Now it’s time to thread the string. Tie one end of the string to a safety pin, large paper clip, or attach a small bodkin. This makes it easier to work it through the casing. Thread it through the casing, safety pin first. 

Once you get the string to the other side, remove your safety pin or other tool and adjust the string so that the ends are even.

 Knot the ends together once or twice to keep it from coming out.

Ta-da! It’s done! Perfect for organizing your purse, storing jewelry or other small items, or as a small gift bag.

Or holding your favorite bar of soap.

Tutorials are always a little complicated to write because it’s easy to overlook small steps in things you do frequently. If something is unclear, please ask. 🙂

If you have any other creative uses for a SubEarthan Cottage soap wrapper, I would love to hear it!

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Posted on

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping

I wrap my soaps in fabric because it looks nice, it allows the soap to breathe (read here for why), and because it feels better than plastic. I often wonder what happens to the wrapping. I’m sure there are some that toss it. I know of one person who collects the fabric for quilts. For those of you who, like me, don’t want to throw away something that could be useful but don’t know what to do with it, I have a tutorial for a drawstring pouch, just for you.

This is done with the wrapping from one of my soaps, but you could make it in any size you like.

Materials
Cloth wrapper from soap (roughly 8×11 inches)
Jute string from soap (about 29 inches)
Thread

Tools
Needle or Sewing machine
Safety pin or Bodkin
Scissors
Iron

First, iron your fabric flat. Then, fold down a long edge about 3/4 of an inch to one inch and press. This is for the casing. It doesn’t have to be super precise.

Sew a straight seam along the bottom of the flap to form the casing. All the sewing can be done by hand or machine. I have no time or patience, so I choose machine. Fold your material in half with right sides together like a book.

The fold is at the bottom of this photo.

Next, starting just below the casing seam, sew down the side and across the bottom. I use anywhere from a 1/4 to 1/2 inch seam allowance for this. Again, it doesn’t have to be precise.

 With scissors, clip the bottom corners, being careful not to cut your stitching. You could probably skip this step, but it helps the corners look square and crisp. Turn your bag right side out.

Now it’s time to thread the string. Tie one end of the string to a safety pin, large paper clip, or attach a small bodkin. This makes it easier to work it through the casing. Thread it through the casing, safety pin first. 

Once you get the string to the other side, remove your safety pin or other tool and adjust the string so that the ends are even.

 Knot the ends together once or twice to keep it from coming out.

Ta-da! It’s done! Perfect for organizing your purse, storing jewelry or other small items, or as a small gift bag.

Or holding your favorite bar of soap.

Tutorials are always a little complicated to write because it’s easy to overlook small steps in things you do frequently. If something is unclear, please ask. 🙂

If you have any other creative uses for a SubEarthan Cottage soap wrapper, I would love to hear it!

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Posted on

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping

I wrap my soaps in fabric because it looks nice, it allows the soap to breathe (read here for why), and because it feels better than plastic. I often wonder what happens to the wrapping. I’m sure there are some that toss it. I know of one person who collects the fabric for quilts. For those of you who, like me, don’t want to throw away something that could be useful but don’t know what to do with it, I have a tutorial for a drawstring pouch, just for you.

This is done with the wrapping from one of my soaps, but you could make it in any size you like.

Materials
Cloth wrapper from soap (roughly 8×11 inches)
Jute string from soap (about 29 inches)
Thread

Tools
Needle or Sewing machine
Safety pin or Bodkin
Scissors
Iron

First, iron your fabric flat. Then, fold down a long edge about 3/4 of an inch to one inch and press. This is for the casing. It doesn’t have to be super precise.

Sew a straight seam along the bottom of the flap to form the casing. All the sewing can be done by hand or machine. I have no time or patience, so I choose machine. Fold your material in half with right sides together like a book.

The fold is at the bottom of this photo.

Next, starting just below the casing seam, sew down the side and across the bottom. I use anywhere from a 1/4 to 1/2 inch seam allowance for this. Again, it doesn’t have to be precise.

 With scissors, clip the bottom corners, being careful not to cut your stitching. You could probably skip this step, but it helps the corners look square and crisp. Turn your bag right side out.

Now it’s time to thread the string. Tie one end of the string to a safety pin, large paper clip, or attach a small bodkin. This makes it easier to work it through the casing. Thread it through the casing, safety pin first. 

Once you get the string to the other side, remove your safety pin or other tool and adjust the string so that the ends are even.

 Knot the ends together once or twice to keep it from coming out.

Ta-da! It’s done! Perfect for organizing your purse, storing jewelry or other small items, or as a small gift bag.

Or holding your favorite bar of soap.

Tutorials are always a little complicated to write because it’s easy to overlook small steps in things you do frequently. If something is unclear, please ask. 🙂

If you have any other creative uses for a SubEarthan Cottage soap wrapper, I would love to hear it!

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping was originally published on SubEarthan Cottage

Posted on

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping

I wrap my soaps in fabric because it looks nice, it allows the soap to breathe (read here for why), and because it feels better than plastic. I often wonder what happens to the wrapping. I’m sure there are some that toss it. I know of one person who collects the fabric for quilts. For those of you who, like me, don’t want to throw away something that could be useful but don’t know what to do with it, I have a tutorial for a drawstring pouch, just for you.

This is done with the wrapping from one of my soaps, but you could make it in any size you like.

Materials
Cloth wrapper from soap (roughly 8×11 inches)
Jute string from soap (about 29 inches)
Thread

Tools
Needle or Sewing machine
Safety pin or Bodkin
Scissors
Iron

First, iron your fabric flat. Then, fold down a long edge about 3/4 of an inch to one inch and press. This is for the casing. It doesn’t have to be super precise.

Sew a straight seam along the bottom of the flap to form the casing. All the sewing can be done by hand or machine. I have no time or patience, so I choose machine. Fold your material in half with right sides together like a book.

The fold is at the bottom of this photo.

Next, starting just below the casing seam, sew down the side and across the bottom. I use anywhere from a 1/4 to 1/2 inch seam allowance for this. Again, it doesn’t have to be precise.

 With scissors, clip the bottom corners, being careful not to cut your stitching. You could probably skip this step, but it helps the corners look square and crisp. Turn your bag right side out.

Now it’s time to thread the string. Tie one end of the string to a safety pin, large paper clip, or attach a small bodkin. This makes it easier to work it through the casing. Thread it through the casing, safety pin first. 

Once you get the string to the other side, remove your safety pin or other tool and adjust the string so that the ends are even.

 Knot the ends together once or twice to keep it from coming out.

Ta-da! It’s done! Perfect for organizing your purse, storing jewelry or other small items, or as a small gift bag.

Or holding your favorite bar of soap.

Tutorials are always a little complicated to write because it’s easy to overlook small steps in things you do frequently. If something is unclear, please ask. 🙂

If you have any other creative uses for a SubEarthan Cottage soap wrapper, I would love to hear it!