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Refashion a Camisole into a Tunic Tank Top

I have tons of clothes waiting for me to refashion them into something more wearable, but haven’t had much inspiration. Recently, though, I came across CreoleSha on Etsy. I love her flowy designs. Luckily, she offers classes on Teachable, so I took her free course on upcycling a sweatshirt or t-shirt into a tunic.

Refashion Camisole Tunic Tank 1
Almost forgot to take a before photo.

My refashion notes

It’s summer, so rather than use a sweatshirt, I started with a camisole tank that I didn’t wear much. I liked the color, but the fit was too loose to use for layering, and the skinny straps made it difficult to wear with a bra. By adapting the techniques in CreoleSha’s class, I turned it into a longer, flowing tank and then added a bit of cotton lace salvaged from an older refashion project to widen the straps.

The added material came from a t-shirt with a large logo on the front. I liked the color, but not the logo, so it was perfect and added some nice contrast.

Of course, pockets are always handy, so I added some patch pockets on the front.

Final result

It’s not perfect, but it’s something I’m more comfortable wearing now. The shirts were wrinkled from storage to the point that the wrinkles came back even after ironing. Luckily they smoothed out with laundering, so I don’t look like I just rolled out of bed when I wear it. More importantly, trying something a little on the artsy side and just jumping in has me ready to tackle more refashions.

A note on my dress form

Before working on this, I took the time to add some batting to my dressform, Athena. She’s a little less padded in some areas than I am, so the batting makes it easier to use her as a fit guide when I don’t want to try things on over and over. The brown t-shirt helps hold it all together and provides something to pin into.

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Organizational Tools for Peace at Home: Ultimate Homemaking Bundle

Affiliate disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase through any of the links on this page, I will receive a small commission at no additional cost to you. All the statements contained in this post are my honest opinions of the product, the Ultimate Homemaking Bundle 2020.

With everyone spending more time at home, it’s easy to feel like you should be able to stay on top of everything. The house should be spotless, closets decluttered, laundry clean and put away, delicious home-cooked meals ready on time and the kitchen cleaned up promptly after. If you’re home all day, it should be easy, right?

What could possibly be difficult about having an organized home with these three?

The truth is, it’s not that simple. Being home all day, especially with children, means more time to make more messes. If you work from home, you’re technically at home, but still have similar time demands to working at an office. Homeschooling adds its own time demands. Even if you have the time, it’s easy to get overwhelmed looking at a mountain of tasks and not know where to begin.

Enter the Ultimate Homemaking Bundle

I absolutely love the Ultimate Homemaking Bundle because over 50 women have contributed their tried-and-true resources to help you have a home that’s calm, organized, and well-run.

If you’ve never heard of it, the Ultimate Homemaking Bundle has been around since 2013, and since then, over 139,000 women (and probably some men, too) have purchased a copy to learn practical strategies for decreasing stress and making a home (and life!) they love.

When you buy the Ultimate Homemaking Bundle, you’ll get access to:

  • 14 eCourses & videos
  • 9 eBooks
  • 9 workbooks
  • 8 planners
  • 8 printable packs
  • 3 membership sites & summits

The creators behind these resources are 50+ women who have struggled with the same things you do, but have learned (and will teach you) how to simplify homes, declutter & organize, put healthy meals on the table, and nurture strong family relationships.

Best of all, you can get the entire package, all for just $29.97. This price hasn’t gone up since it was first released 8 years ago – which is an amazing deal, considering the prices of most things these days!

Over the years, I’ve purchased several bundles offered through Ultimate Bundles. Throughout the year, they offer bundles for things like healthy living, DIY projects, photography, and blogging as well as the current homemaking bundle. They’re all offered for a limited time at a steep discount compared to purchasing the resources in each bundle separately. If there’s even one or two of the resources in the bundle that you find useful, it usually more than justifies the cost. They also offer a 30 day money back guarantee, so if you get it and find that it’s not what you thought it would be, you can easily request a refund.

Ultimate Homemaking Bundle 2020

I just got my Ultimate Homemaking Bundle yesterday, so I haven’t had time to thoroughly explore all the resources. Looking through them, though, there are several that I’m really excited about.

Ebooks

I love ebooks because I can load them onto my Kindle Paperwhite that I carry with me in my purse. That way, I always have something to read any time I have a few minutes of downtime. From this bundle, I’m looking forward to reading these:

  • Cleaning with Essential Oils: Your Guide to All Natural Cleaning by Kristyn Bango
  • Garden Harvest Recipes: A Plant to Plate Cookbook by Holly Bertone
  • Quick Start Guide to Water Bath Canning by Victoria Pruett

Planners

Printable planners are awesome because you can print and use only what you need. You can also take elements from different planners to create a perfect planner that works for you. This year’s bundle offers several planners, including ones for cleaning, homeschooling and reaching your goals. These planners are of particular interest to me:

Cleaning

  • Declutter in Minutes Planner by Tracy Lynn
  • Motivated Moms Classic Planner by Susan Cramer
  • The Confident Mom Weekly Household Planner and Supplement Kit by Susan Heid

Homeschooling

  • The Homeschool Planner: Simply Plan, Simply Homeschool by Sean and Caroline Allen

Goals

  • Dreams by Design 2020 Planner by Karen Schravemade
Ultimate Homemaking Bundle 2020

Ecourses

To be honest, I haven’t used the ecourses as much in the past. Even though they are totally at your own pace, I tend to start them, get busy with other things and never get back to them. There’s several in this bundle that look really helpful, though, so I will have to do better this time. From the ecourses, these are the ones I think will benefit me the most:

  • 5 Days of Cleaning Motivation: Get Motivated to Clean! Are you in? by Joanie Boeckman
  • Exercise Around The World: Explore The Geographical Roots of Fitness through Movement by Beth Learn
  • Inspire a Love of Learning by Kerry Beck
  • Not So Bummer Summer by JoAnn Crohn (geared towards children)
  • Take Ten Challenge by Laura Coppinger (meal planning)
  • Time Management Freedom by Deanna Dolbel (online business)
  • Uncomplicated Kitchen: 3 Step System for Simpler Weeknight Cooking by Ruthy Kirwan

Other Ultimate Homemaking Bundle 2020 resources

Those are just a sample of the many resources contained in this bundle. Not only are there more in each of those categories, I haven’t even mentioned the membership site access, printables, summits, and workbooks you’ll get. There’s also several bonuses that include gift certificates or products free for the cost of shipping.

If any of these resources sound like something that would help you, I urge you to take a look at the complete list here. Full disclosure: If you purchase through any of the links on this page, I will receive a small commission at no additional cost to you.

Ultimate Homemaking Bundle 2020

On the other hand, if you’ve made it this far and don’t think this bundle is for you, don’t worry. My next post will be back to the content you’re used to from SubEarthan Cottage. I’ve been working on a few clothing refashions, and I’ve had to do another repair on my Kenmore sewing machine. Expect posts on those soon!

Time left to get your Ultimate Homemaking Bundle.

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Easy Leggings Hack for Summer

If you or your kiddos wear leggings, you’ll love this easy leggings hack for summer. While you can use any leggings, it’s perfect for turning leggings that have worn out at the knees or ended up being a little too see-through into something usable, especially when the weather turns hot. This hack is so simple, I feel a bit silly making a post about it. It’s really one of those “Why didn’t I think of that?” things.

How to do it.

All you need is a pair of leggings you want to make shorter and some good scissors. Fold them in half so that the legs lay on top of each other. Make sure the fabric is smooth and the legs match up at the hem. Decide how much shorter you want them and cut them at that length, keeping the line parallel to the hem. My scissors cut through both legs easily, but you can always cut one and use it as a guide to cut the other.

Here’s what I cut off. I like leaving mine either just above or just below the knee.

Because knit doesn’t fray, you don’t have to hem the raw edge. When stretched, the edge will roll a tiny bit and hide the edge. You may want to seal the seam that you cut through with a little fabric glue or a few stitches. I have some I cut last summer without doing anything to the seams and they’ve held up through many wearings and washings without coming apart.

How I like to wear my shortened leggings

I like wearing dresses or skirts in the summer because Texas is hot, lol. With little kids, though, I’m constantly up and down or bending to pick things up off the floor. Cropped leggings underneath give me enough coverage to make dresses practical for everyday. Leggings under my dresses also prevents uncomfortable chafing from being a bit, um, curvy in the thighs. For this purpose, I really like using this hack for leggings that I wouldn’t feel comfortable wearing without a long tunic or dress. Instead of taking up space at the back of my closet, they get used and make my other clothes more wearable.

Ways to repurpose the cut off section

The cut off sections can be repurposed, too. A really simple thing to do is make hair bands by cutting them in one inch strips parallel to the hem. Be sure to keep the seam intact so they’re a circle.

You can also make a pocket for your leggings out of the cut off section. Decide how big you want your pocket to be and add a half inch or so seam allowance to each side and the bottom. Use the existing hem as the top of your pocket to save time. Fold the seam allowance under and stitch in place on your leggings where you want the pocket. You’ll want to use a narrow zig-zag or stretch stitch to prevent the thread from breaking. A ball point needle is ideal for sewing knits, so if you have one, use it.

Leggings hack pocket
Here’s one pocket I’ve added.

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DIY Soft Scrub Cleaner

DIY Soft Scrub

I like getting my kiddos involved in housecleaning. Not just because they are highly involved in making messes, but because it is important that they know how to take care of themselves as adults. I’m pretty choosy as to what cleaning products I will let them use. So many cleaners are irritating to the skin, eyes and lungs.

Not only do I want my cleaning products to be safe, I like things that multitask and don’t cost an arm and a leg. Often, I’ve found the best way to achieve this is to make them myself, like with my natural furniture polish. With a few simple ingredients I keep around the house anyway, I find I can cover most cleaning needs.

My most recent cleaning concoction is soft scrub. It works well for when I need a little extra scrubbing power than I get with my usual all-purpose water, vinegar and dish soap mix.

Soft scrub in a jar
Soft scrub in a jar

Soft Scrub Ingredients

  • 1 cup of baking soda
  • 1/4 cup of liquid soap
  • 1 tablespoon of hydrogen peroxide
  • Optional: 2-3 drops of essential oil

Instructions

Place all the ingredients into a big bowl and mix until a uniform paste forms. To store, I like to scoop it into a wide mouth canning jar, but any lidded container will work. The mix will expand, so use a container that allows for at least double the amount to be safe.

Mixing the soft scrub
Mixing the soft scrub

Variations

Type of Soap

Liquid castile soap will work, but for extra cleaning power I prefer a detergent soap, like Dr. Bronner’s Sal Suds or even Dawn dish soap. You could probably get away with any liquid hand soap or liquefied bar soap, but I haven’t tried those yet. The only time I haven’t liked it was when I made it with Ajax dish soap because that is what I had on hand. I think there was something in the Ajax that reacted badly with the baking soda or hydrogen peroxide. That mixture was fluffier and had an odd smell. I’m not quite sure what it was that caused it, but because of that, I recommend staying away from any dish soap that advertise extra cleaning additives. For the soap, basic is better.

Scent

I rarely add any essential oils for fragrance. Usually the soap I have is already scented, so I don’t see the need. Really, unscented is fine, too, unless you just prefer a scent to signal that something is clean. If I were to add an essential oil, though, I would probably use either peppermint, lemon or tea tree oil. If you choose to use an essential oil, please be aware of safety guidelines for using them around children, pregnant women, pets, and other sensitive individuals.

How to use

To use, I scoop out a dollop of the soft scrub and apply a layer to the area I’m cleaning. I usually let it sit for a minute or two then buff it off with a rag. If there’s a residue left, I’ll either wipe it down with a damp rag or mist it with my all purpose vinegar, dish soap and water solution and wipe it clean.

Results

I almost forgot to take a before photo. This is an embarrassing photo of tomato sauce splatter left on my stove overnight.

Before using soft scrub to clean last night's spaghetti sauce.
Before using soft scrub to clean last night’s spaghetti sauce.

This is a photo of what it looks like after using my soft scrub and minimal elbow grease.

Shiny stovetop
Shiny stovetop

I do apologize for the blurry photos. Lighting in my kitchen isn’t the greatest, and also I was in the middle of cleaning.

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Patching Denim Jeans and Embroidery Embellishment

Another way to patch denim jeans

My mom gave me several pairs of worn out denim jeans for me to play with several months ago.  A few just happened to be my favorite style from Old Navy and in my size. Rather than cut them up for other projects, I decided to make them cute with patches and a little embroidery. Here’s the method I used for patching denim jeans.

Another way to patch denim jeans
First, the knees.

Patching the knees

Prepping the denim jeans

In order to sew at the knees, you have to carefully rip out the stitches along one leg seam. You don’t have to rip out the entire seam, but you need to give yourself plenty of room above and below the knee to work. One seam is usually top-stitched. To make it easier all around, do NOT rip out the top-stitched seam.

After ripping out the seam, press the denim as smooth as possible with an iron.

Prepping the fabric

To patch the denim jeans, I chose to go underneath the rips and leave the torn edges visible. For the patches, I used cotton quilting material left over from sewing masks . I cut the fabric into squares a few inches bigger than I needed to patch. In the future, I will probably interface the fabric at this time. I knew I planned to interface everything at a later step, though, so I didn’t.

I pinned the fabric to the inside of the denim jeans.

Sewing the patches

Before sewing the crazy stitches shown in the photos, I sewed a single line of stitching all around the patch about a quarter of an inch inside the edge of the quilting fabric. This kept it in place while I did the crazy reinforcing stitches. After it was secure, I stitched in all different directions between the edge of the tear and slightly overlapping the first single line of stitching.

This side was more worn out, so it got more reinforcement stitching.

When jeans rip, usually the material around the tear is worn thin as well. In the past, I often left too much of the worn area without reinforcement. This results in new rips soon after the first repair. This time I reinforced at least an inch and a half around the tears.

Reinforcing the patched denim jeans with interfacing

After I was done stitching, I ironed interfacing to the inside. I did the interfacing last to act as a soft layer between my knees and the stitching. In retrospect, I probably should have interfaced the quilting cotton first, and then interfaced again at this step if I felt it was necessary. So far my jeans are holding up with the way I did it, though.

Sew it up

With the patches done, all that’s left is resewing the side seams. I just pinned it closed and sewed it back along the original stitching line. For the overcasting to finish the raw edges, I was lazy and used the overedge stitch on my sewing machine instead of switching to my serger. Zig-zag stitching along the edge to finish it would also work.

Embroidering the pocket

To embroider the pocket, I first removed the pocket from my jeans. Since it’s too small to hoop, I hooped tear away stabilizer alone and secured the pocket to the stabilizer with a glue stick. I used my Damask Rose embroidery pattern for the embellishment.

After the embroidery machine was done working its magic, I removed the stabilizer and replaced the pocket on my jeans using a heavy denim thread in a close shade to the original thread.

Simple, right? Actually, I tried to do that, messed up the hook timing on my Kenmore sewing machine AGAIN within the first few stitches and had to move to my backup vintage Montgomery Ward Signature machine. It took a few minutes of fiddling with the settings, but once I got it set up correctly it sewed through the heavy denim layers like butter.

In all fairness to my Kenmore, I did probably deserve it this time, between the crazy reinforcement stitches and then trying to sew through multiple layers of denim with thick thread. At least this time it let me reset the hook timing without much fuss.

Have you gotten more acquainted with your sewing machine lately? I’d love to see your projects in the comments.

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Cloth Diapering – Types of Cloth Diapers

Beckett with cloth diapers in the background

Many parents are choosing cloth diapers over disposables. Cloth diapering saves money and space in the landfills. They also give you peace of mind. As long as you can do laundry, you will never run out of diapers. That’s always a good thing, but with stores limiting hours and sometimes running out of things like diapers and wipes, it’s especially important.

If you’re new to cloth diapering, it can be a bit overwhelming to navigate the different types of cloth diapers on the market. Today’s choices go beyond the pinned white squares our parents and grandparents used to include styles so user friendly even the most skeptical caregivers will be comfortable using them.

Here are the basics based on my research. If you have anything to add, please feel free to comment:

Flats

A large square of woven material, most commonly cotton, that have to be folded and pinned. They will leak unless you also use a waterproof diaper wrap/cover. Instead of diaper pins, you can also use a Snappi to hold flats in place.

Prefolds

A rectangle of cotton or other woven material with a thicker, absorbent middle section. Most moms have a few of these around even if they don’t cloth diaper because they make excellent burp cloths. They still require a little folding to get the best fit for your baby, but nowhere near as much as flats. Like flats, they’ll need pinned (or use a Snappi) and a leak-proof cover.

Fitted Cloth Diapers

Fitteds are made from an absorbent material and shaped to fit without folding. They usually close with Velcro or snaps, so you don’t need pins. They do not have a waterproof layer, so you’ll need a cover to make them leak-proof.

All-in-one Cloth Diapers (AIO)

All-in-ones are essentially fitteds with the addition of a leak-proof layer. The leak-proof layer is most commonly made with PUL, a plastic laminated material. They close with Velcro or snaps.

All in twos (AI2)

Similar to all-in-ones, except that a separate absorbent layer is placed inside of the diaper. This helps them dry faster because each layer is thinner. You can also customize the absorbency by adding layers as needed. They close with Velcro or snaps.

Pocket Diapers

Essentially a specific type of AI2. With pockets, the absorbent layer (insert) is placed in a pocket between a waterproof outer layer and an inner layer of fleece or some other material that lets wetness through to the insert and keeps baby’s skin dry. They close with Velcro or snaps.

Beckett with cloth diapers in the background
Sweet baby Beckett with his OS, pocket cloth diapers in the background.

One size (OS)

Means that the size of the diaper can be adjusted to fit most babies from infancy to toddlerhood as opposed to sized diapers that fit a weight range.

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5 Positives to Grocery Shopping with Social Distancing

Beckett grocery shopping

Social distancing due to COVID-19 has made a big impact on all our lives. It’s all to easy to focus on the negative impacts but there are positives as well. Here’s five of the ways social distancing has made a positive impact on my grocery shopping.

Shopping kid-free for social distancing

If you’re lucky enough to have someone to watch your children, you’ve probably been shopping kid-free. That was my preference before, too, but now it’s easier to insist that they stay home with Daddy. Not only does it help with social distancing, it makes it easier to focus on getting what I need and getting out.

Beckett grocery shopping before social distancing
One of my little hooligans. While I like them taking part in grocery shopping, it’s definitely easier to shop without them.

Fine-tuning weekly shopping

I used to try to make grocery shopping a weekly event, but I would always wind up making extra trips for things we need throughout the week. Now, though, I’m definitely more motivated to shop once a week at the most. Because of this, I’ve paid close attention to how quickly we use up staples and adjusted my shopping list accordingly.

Creating a realistic budget

Weekly shopping makes it easier to keep track of how much we spend on groceries. Knowing exactly what we spend in a week makes it easier to realistically plan how much of our budget needs to go towards groceries.

Since we haven’t eaten anything other than home cooked food since around the end of February, we have a clear picture of what it costs to eat every meal at home. Comparing the cost of one meal out to our current weekly expense makes it clear just how much eating at home saves.

Sticking to a list

Weekly shopping means having a thorough list. Forgetting something means going without or having to make a second trip. I’ve been much more thoughtful about planning for snacks and accurately gauging how long the staples we have on hand should last.

Needing an accurate list made me reorganize some of my kitchen storage. Knowing what I have is the first step to knowing what I need and what I need to use up.

Getting creative

Weekly shopping and eating at home for every meal has made me get more creative. I’ve always been more of a well-stocked pantry person than a detailed meal planner. While I don’t usually have a specific meal plan, I always have some general meal ideas when I head to the store. That flexibility, along with knowing what I have at home, works really well when I may have to make last minute substitutions at the grocery store due to shortages.

To keep us from getting totally bored with eating at home, I try to experiment with a new recipe at least once a week. I don’t wan’t to have to make a separate trip to find specialty ingredients, so I look for recipes that use mostly staple ingredients with maybe one or two new ingredients, like curry or miso paste that bigger grocery stores are likely to carry. That way, if they don’t have it, I can easily work with what I have.

Near the end of the week, I try to use up any leftovers, sometimes combining them with new ingredients to make something different.

What positives have you noticed with social distancing regulations? Please, share them in the comments.

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